Thomas Aquinas lived a relatively short life, but during his time in the church he became one of the most influential theologians of all time. In his Summa Theologiae he presents an older philosophical argument from Aristotle in support for the existence of the Christian God. This argument suggests God can be inferred through natural reasoning.

The first and more manifest way is the argument from motion. It is certain, and evident to our senses, that in the world some things are in motion. Now whatever is in motion is put in motion by another, for nothing can be in motion except it is in potentiality to that towards which it is in motion; whereas a thing moves inasmuch as it is in act. For motion is nothing else than the reduction of something from potentiality to actuality. But nothing can be reduced from potentiality to actuality, except by something in a state of actuality. Thus that which is actually hot, as fire, makes wood, which is potentially hot, to be actually hot, and thereby moves and changes it. Now it is not possible that the same thing should be at once in actuality and potentiality in the same respect, but only in different respects. For what is actually hot cannot simultaneously be potentially hot; but it is simultaneously potentially cold. It is therefore impossible that in the same respect and in the same way a thing should be both mover and moved, i.e. that it should move itself. Therefore, whatever is in motion must be put in motion by another. If that by which it is put in motion be itself put in motion, then this also must needs be put in motion by another, and that by another again. But this cannot go on to infinity, because then there would be no first mover, and consequently, no other mover; seeing that subsequent movers move only inasmuch as they are put in motion by the first mover; as the staff moves only because it is put in motion by the hand. Therefore it is necessary to arrive at a first mover, put in motion by no other; and this everyone understands to be God. – Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologiae c. ~ 1270.

The original argument is known as "The First Mover". The motion being discussed is more general than simply movement through space. Rather we are talking about any changes that occur in the material world. When things change, they are moving closer to their final actual state. Aquinas explains it as "reduction from potentiality to actuality".